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Centre for Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

In the historical building of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA) a unique research centre has since 1992 hosted more than 1000 outstanding researchers from all over the world.  

Centre for Advanced Study (CAS), in Norwegian Senter for grunnforskning, is an independent research centre that hosts three international and interdisciplinary research groups each year. The goal is to strengthen and internationalise independent basic research of excellence. 

CAS was established by DNVA in 1989, and is organised as an independent foundation with a board appointed by DNVA, The Norwegian Association of Higher Education Institutions and The Research Council of Norway (NFR).

Heather Swanson holds a seminar about domestication. Every semester the research groups at the Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) are asked to hold lunch seminars.

Heather Swanson holds a seminar about domestication. Every semester the research groups at the Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) are asked to hold lunch seminars. 

Accepts applications every year

Following a thorough application process, the board selects outstanding researchers from Norwegian universities to lead groups composed of international researchers for a one-year stay. There are three groups yearly within the fields of:

 
Each group has some members whose affiliation to CAS is for the whole academic year, and several researchers participate in the research groups for shorter periods of time.

The groups are also expected to include one or two post-doctoral candidates, which is a vital part of communicating and passing on the research for future generations. Each year 40-45 researchers of 10-15 nationalities participate in the research projects at CAS.  

The project proposals go through a thorough evaluation process, including an international peer review, before three research groups are selected two years in advance.

Next advertisement is expected in October with deadline January 2017.    

 - Most productive year of my career

The researchers at the Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) are allocated bright and well equipped offices. Inger-Maren Rivrud was part of the research project Climate effects on harvested large mammals.The researchers at the Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) are allocated bright and well equipped offices. Inger-Maren Rivrud was part of the research project Climate effects on harvested large mammals.

Former participants often describe their stay at CAS as the best and most productive year of their career. One key to success is that CAS provides the whole package.

The Administration assists CAS fellows with housing, planning and execution of conferences, offer technical equipment, library services and lunch every day.

From anthropology to neuroscience

At the Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) lunch is organised daily. Here: Professor Houston Smit and Professor Jon Swenson.At the Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) lunch is organised daily. Here: Professor Houston Smit and Professor Jon Swenson.

A cornerstone of the CAS concept is that the Centre facilitates for communication and cooperation across research fields.

The three 2016/2017 CAS projects are After Discourse: Things, Archaeology, and Heritage in the 21st Century, Airborne: Pollution, Climate Change, and New Visions of Sustainability in China, and Several Complex Variables and Complex Dynamics

Read about former and future research projects here.

The quality of the research at the centre is mirrored in the numerous books and articles deriving from research at CAS, not to mention the many prizes awarded to CAS fellows.

Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, the NWO Spinoza Prize, John Desmond Bernal Prize of the Society for Social Studies of Science, The Kavli prize and Fridtjof Nansen medal for Outstanding Research are some of the prizes awarded researchers with affiliation to CAS.

Scientific leader of Centre for Advanced Study (CAS), Professor Vigdis Broch-Due.Scientific leader of Centre for Advanced Study (CAS), Professor Vigdis Broch-Due.

Scientific Director Vigdis Broch-Due

The day-to-day operation of CAS is handled by a Scientific Director with an administrative team of four permanent staff members. 1/3 of the Scientific Director’s position is reserved her/his own research.

In 2014, the CAS board appointed Professor Vigdis Broch-Due as Scientific Director. Working Chair of the board is Professor Geir Ellingsrud.

Vigdis Broch-Due is a Professor at the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen, but holds a special Professoriate in International Poverty Research at the Faculty of Social Sciences. She has experience from research- and teaching positions at universities in Washington, Oslo, Uppsala, Cambridge, London and Rutgers University, and has been involved in the UN’s work on poverty reduction and international humanitarian aid evaluations.

Her research in Kenya and Eastern Africa spans three decades. She has conducted numerous ethnographic studies of different Turkana groups (hunters, farmers, fishermen), and more recently in the border areas where also Turkana and Samburu, Borana, Somali and Pokot live. Another field of expertise is the history of poverty and its ethnographic variation, including the European since the Middle Ages, and the British Empire focusing on India and Africa. She has been involved in numerous film documentaries from Kenya, India and South America.

Broch-Due has published a wide range of books and articles. Central themes are gender and cosmology, materiality, inequality and violence, relations between humans and animals, colonization, humanitarian aid and globalization. Her most recent books Trusting and its Tribulations: Interdisciplinary Engagements with Intimacy, Sociality and Trust (Berghahn) and Violent Reverberations: Global Modalities of Trauma (Palgrave) come out in 2016.

More of CAS

Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) launched their new website and celebrated this at Litteraturhuset in Oslo in April 2016. Group leader for the research project Disclosing the Fabric of Reality- Metaphysics in the Age of Science, Professor Camilla Serck-Hanssen, held an engaging speech about why humanistic research is important. Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) launched their new website and celebrated this at Litteraturhuset in Oslo in April 2016. Group leader for the research project Disclosing the Fabric of Reality- Metaphysics in the Age of Science, Professor Camilla Serck-Hanssen, held an engaging speech about why humanistic research is important.

In 2016 CAS launched a new website.

The new website functions as a channel for information for potential future researchers as well as a tool for current CAS-fellows.

Through interviews, articles and podcasts about the research at CAS, we seek to make the information about the Centre more accessible and understandable to the public.

CAS is now on Facebook and Twitter, and you can download the Centre’s podcast in iTunes or listen on Soundcloud.

 

Det Norske Videnskaps-Akademi
Drammensveien 78
N-0271 Oslo
Telefon: +47 22 84 15 00
E-post: post@dnva.no
 
Nettredaktør: Anne-Marie Astad
Design og teknisk løsning: Ravn Webveveriet AS
 
The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters
Drammensveien 78
N-0271 Oslo, Norway
Telephone: + 47 22 84 15 00
E-mail: post@dnva.no
Web editor: Anne-Marie Astad
Design and technical solutions: Ravn Webveveriet AS