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Birkeland Lecture 2010: Voyages to the International Space Station

- a marvellous platform for research and future space exploration

Dr. Christer Fuglesang will in his Birkeland Lecture take us on a trip to the International Space Station and show us what a marvellous platform for research and future space exploration it is. The speaker had the great fortune and privilege to take part in the construction of ISS in space during two space shuttle missions and has also performed some experiments there related to radiation in space. Part of that personal story will be presented together with the scientific potential of ISS and a vision of future space exploration.

Dr. Christer Fuglesang, Science and Application Division, Human Space Flight Directorate, European Space Agency (ESA)  Voyages to the International Space Station - a marvellous platform for research and future space exploration.

The International Space Station has been assembled in orbit, 350 km above Earth, since 1998 and is now all but complete. It has been permanently inhabited for ten years. ISS is a fabulous wonder, which has been as politically and socially challenging to build as technologically demanding. But now it offers a multitude of research potentials to many scientific communities around the world. Most of them exploit the weightlessness (or micro-gravity, to be specific) in orbit to perform experiments in fundamental physics, material science, fluid physics, biology and physiology. However the space station also offers an outstanding platform to look both down towards Earth and out into space. AMS, e.g., is a unique instrument that will detect particles, and anti-particles, from outer space for at least ten years on the outside of ISS. A full program is being studied on how to best utilize the space station for research on climate change. Last, but not least, from ISS one can do wonderful observations of auroras and related phenomena in the upper atmosphere, the favourite field of Kristian Birkeland.

Birkeland Lecturer 2010

Dr. Christer Fuglesang
Astronaut,
Head of Science and Application Division, Human Space Flight Directorate,
European Space Agency (ESA)

Born in Stockholm, Sweden. Received a Master of Science in engineering physics from the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, in 1981, and a Doctorate in experimental particle physics in 1987. In 1988, he became a Fellow of CERN, and  Senior Fellow in 1989. In November 1990, Fuglesang obtained a position at the Manne Siegbahn Institute of Physics, Stockholm, working towards the new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project in CERN. He became a Docent in particle physics at the University of Stockholm in 1991. He was appointed Affiliated Professor at KTH in 2006.

Fuglesang was selected to join the European Astronaut Corps, based at the European Astronaut Centre (EAC) in Cologne, Germany in 1992. He followed the introductory training programme at EAC and a training programme at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre(GCTC) in Russia. He completed basic training at EAC in 1993. He was then selected for the Euromir 95 mission and commenced training at GCTC in preparation for flight engineer tasks, extravehicular activities (spacewalks) and operation of the Soyuz spacecraft.

In March 1995, he was selected as member of Crew 2 for the Euromir 95 mission. During the mission Fuglesang was the prime Crew Interface Coordinator (CIC).
Fuglesang entered the Mission Specialist Class at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, in 1996. In 2002, he was assigned as a Mission Specialist to the STS-116 Space Shuttle mission, and in 2008 as Mission Specialist on the STS-128 Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station.
From 9 to 22 December 2006, Christer Fuglesang flew as Mission Specialist on Space Shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station. He became the first Swedish astronaut to fly in space. During this mission he conducted three spacewalks, to attach new hardware to the ISS and to reconfigure the Station's electrical power system.

Fuglesang participated in his second spaceflight from 29 August to 12 September 2009 as Mission Specialist to the International Space Station. During this mission Fuglesang made two spacewalks. He also undertook experiment, educational and public relations activities as part of this mission.
In May 2010 Fuglesang took up the position as Head of Science and Application Division in the Human Space Flight directorate of ESA. He is now stationed at ESTEC in The Netherlands.

About the Birkeland Lecture

The Birkeland Lecture is open for everybody. There is no registration. Free admission.

For more information about the Birkeland Lecture:
Anne-Marie Astad
Information Officer
The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters
Phone: + 47 22 12 10 92
E-mail: anne.marie.astad@dnva.no

Organizing committee

Jan A. Holtet

 

 

 

 

 

  • Professor Jan A. Holtet, Department of Physics, University of Oslo (chairman)
  • Professor Alv Egeland, Department of Physics, University of Oslo
  • Øyvind Sørensen, Chief Executive at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters
  • Svein Flatebø, Corporate Communication, Yara
  • Pål Brekke, Senior Advisor, The Norwegian Space Centre
Det Norske Videnskaps-Akademi
Drammensveien 78
N-0271 Oslo
Telefon: +47 22 84 15 00
E-post: post@dnva.no
 
Nettredaktør: Anne-Marie Astad
Design og teknisk løsning: Ravn Webveveriet AS
 
The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters
Drammensveien 78
N-0271 Oslo, Norway
Telephone: + 47 22 84 15 00
E-mail: post@dnva.no
Web editor: Anne-Marie Astad
Design and technical solutions: Ravn Webveveriet AS